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Choong Moo Meaning

Choong Moo Tul - 30 Movements
- Was the name given to the great Admiral Yi Soon-Sin of the Yi dynasty.  He was reputed to have invented the first armoured battleship (Kobukson) in 1592, which is said to be the precursor of the present day submarine.  The reason why this pattern ends with a left hand attack is to symbolize his regrettable death, having no chance to show his loyalty to the king.

Introduced Techniques

Walking stance inward knife-hand high front strike
Walking stance reverse knife-hand high front strike
Walking stance twin palm upward block
L-stance forearm low block
L-stance X-knife-hand checking block
Sitting stance middle front block
Sitting stance back-fist high side strike
Flying side piercing kick
Middle back piercing kick

Step by Step

CHOONG-MOO

Movements - 30

Ready Posture - PARALLEL READY STANCE

1. Move the left foot to B forming a right L-stance toward B while executing a twin knife-hand block.

2. Move the right foot to B forming a right walking stance toward B while executing a high front strike to B with the right knife-hand and bring the left back hand in front of the forehead.

3. Move the right foot to A turning clockwise to form a left L-stance toward A while executing a middle guarding block to A with a knife-hand.

4. Move the left foot to A forming a left walking stance toward A while executing a high thrust to A with the left flat finger tip.

5. Move the left foot to D forming a right L-stance toward D while executing a middle guarding block to D with a knife-hand.

6. Turn the face to C forming a left bending ready stance A toward C.

7. Execute a middle side piercing kick to C with the right foot.

8. Lower the right foot to C forming a right L-stance toward D while executing a middle guarding block to D with a knife-hand.

9. Execute a flying side piercing kick to D with the right foot soon after moving it to D and then land to D forming a left L-stance toward D while executing a middle guarding block to D with a knife-hand.

10. Move the left foot to E turning anti-clockwise to form a right L-stance toward E at the same time executing a low block to E with the left forearm.

11. Extend both hands upward as if to grab the opponent's head while forming a left walking stance toward E, slipping the left foot.

12. Execute a right knee upward kick to E, pulling both hands downward.

13. Lower the right foot to the left foot and then move the left foot to F forming a left walking stance toward F while executing a high front strike to F with the right reverse knife-hand, bringing the left back hand under the right elbow joint.

14. Execute a high turning kick to DF with the right foot and then lower it to the left foot.

15. Execute a middle back piercing kick to F with the left foot.

Perform 14 and 15 in a fast motion.

16. Lower the left foot to F forming a left L-stance toward E while executing a middle guarding block to E with the forearm.

17. Execute a middle turning kick to DE with the left foot.

18. Lower the left foot to the right foot and move the right foot to C forming a right fixed stance to C while executing a U-shape block toward C.

19. Jump and spin around anti-clockwise, landing on the same spot to form a left L-stance to C while executing a middle knife-hand guarding block to C.

20. Move the left foot to C forming a left walking stance toward C at the same time executing a low thrust to C with the right upset fingertip.

21. Execute a side back strike to D with the right back fist and a low block to C with the left forearm while forming a right L-stance toward C, pulling the left foot.

22. Move the right foot to C forming a right walking stance toward C while executing a middle thrust to C with the right straight finger tip.

23. Move the left foot to B turning anti-clockwise to form a left walking stance to B while executing a high block to B with the left double forearm.

24. Move the right foot to B forming a sitting stance toward C while executing a middle front block to C with the right forearm and then a high side strike to B with the right back fist.

25. Execute a middle side piercing kick to A with the right foot turning anti-clockwise and then lower it to A.

26. Execute a middle side piercing kick to A with the left foot turning clockwise.

27. Lower the left foot to A and then execute a checking block to B with an X-knife-hand, forming a left L-stance toward B pivoting with the left foot.

28. Move the left foot to B forming a left walking stance toward B while executing an upward block to B with a twin palm.

29. Move the left foot on line AB and then execute a rising block with the right forearm while forming a right walking stance toward A.

30. Execute a middle punch to A with the left fist while maintaining a right walking stance toward A.

END: Bring the left foot back to a ready posture.

Choong-Moo: A Korean Military Hero

Choong-Moo, the man, is better known as Admiral Yi Soon-sin, arguably Korea’s greatest military hero. A master naval tactician, Admiral Yi inflicted heavy defeats on the Japanese invaders during the Im-jin Wae-ran wars of the late sixteenth century, forcing them to withdraw from Korea and demolishing nearly their entire fleet with his unique and deadly turtle boats. His posthumous title, Choong-Moo Kong, means ‘Lord of Loyalty and Chivalry’ and is used in one of South Korea's most esteemed military honours, the Order of Choong-Moo. Loyalty and chivalry, therefore, are two personal characteristics to which all Choong-Moo Taekwon-Do students are encouraged and expected to aspire.

My life is simple, my food is plain, and my quarters are uncluttered. In all things, I have sought clarity. I face the troubles and problems of life and death willingly. Virtue, integrity and courage are my priorities. I can be approached, but never pushed; befriended, but never coerced; killed, but never shamed.

Admiral Yi Soon-sin

The Hideyoshi Invasions

In 1592, Japanese warlord Toyotomi Hideyoshi ordered 150,000 armed troops to invade Korea, angered by its refusal to help him conquer China. After landing at Pusan, the Japanese marched north and reached Seoul easily – the Korean resistance had been hastily organised and was hardly a match for the heavily armed and well-trained soldiers. King Sonjo was forced to flee the capital, seeking refuge at the Yalu River on Korea’s northernmost border. Even with the help of China, the Koreans appeared doomed to succumb to Japanese occupation. Indeed, their combined forces soon suffered another heavy defeat at Pyongyang.

The Turtle Boats

The kobuk-son, or ‘turtle boat’, was so named because the iron dome covering its deck looked like a turtle’s shell. Large spikes protruded from the dome to stop enemies from boarding the ship. Cannons were positioned behind small openings all around the boat, allowing the crew to fire in any direction they wished, while archers were able to fire burning arrows at the sails and rigging of enemy ships without fear of being hit themselves. The large dragon’s head on the bow was not only a terrifying sight for the Japanese, but it also contained a small fireplace in which sulphur and saltpetre could be burned – the resulting smoke leaving the enemy dazed and confused.

Victory at Hansan Island

But even as the Japanese forged north towards China, small bands of Korean resistance fighters were staunchly defending their country in the south. One of them, Admiral Yi, repeatedly destroyed reinforcement fleets from Japan at Hansan Island, off the southern coast of Korea near Pusan. Although his turtle boats were much smaller than the Japanese warships, they were protected from the arrows and other missiles fired upon them - and therefore were able to get within close range and destroy their targets at will. With their supplies and reinforcements cut off by Admiral Yi and his navy, the Japanese generals far away in the north were forced to retreat and eventually chose to abandon their quest.

Choong-Moo Kong sailed to Kyonnae-ryang where he saw seven enemy vanguard vessels advancing in their direction, followed by many other crafts spread out all over the sea. He said, “Here the sea is narrow and the shallow harbour unfit for battle, so we must lure them out to the open sea to destroy them in a single blow.” Choong-Moo Kong waved his flag, beat his drum and shouted the order to attack. In an instant, our warships spread their sails, turned round in a ‘Crane-Wing’ formation and darted forward, pouring down cannon balls and fire arrows on the enemy vessels like hail and thunder. Bursting into flame with blinding smoke, 73 enemy vessels were soon burning in a red sea of blood.

Yi Pun, Admiral Yi’s nephew

Admiral Yi is Betrayed

His overwhelming success against the Japanese had made Admiral Yi a national hero, but it also made his rivals extremely jealous. One of these, a fellow officer named Won Kyun, conspired with a Japanese spy to get rid of Yi. Together, they hatched a plot to convince the Korean military leaders that Admiral Yi should be sent to intercept some Japanese ships on their way to destroy Korea – a complete lie. Realising that he was being set up, Admiral Yi refused to undertake the mission and was sacked by the king. Won Kyun was made naval commander in his place.

Yi was taken to Seoul where he was put in prison, beaten and tortured – and even sentenced to death. But the people pleaded with King Sonjo to set him free, begging for their hero’s life. King Sonjo released Yi, but relegated him to the rank of an ordinary foot soldier – a duty which he performed honourably and without complaint, remaining loyal to his country even in the face of humiliation and deceit.

The Second Japanese Invasion

Hideyoshi launched a second invasion in 1597, destroying the Korean fleet with ease and beheading the traitorous Won Kyun. However, the Chinese and Korean resistance was better prepared this time and managed to turn the Japanese back before they reached Seoul. Restored to his rightful post, Admiral Yi was able to lead what was left of his fleet to victory. Hideyoshi died and Japan lost interest in trying to conquer Korea or China. But Admiral Yi set upon the retreating Japanese, determined to destroy every ship in the fleet. He nearly succeeded, sinking over 200 ships and handing Japan its worst military defeat for the next 350 years.

An Honourable Death

During that final battle against the retreating Japanese in November 1598, Admiral Yi was felled by a chance bullet. His nephew recalled what happened:”At dawn, Choong-Moo Kong plunged his entire fleet into a final battle with the enemy, thundering ‘Charge!’. Suddenly a stray bullet from the enemy vessel struck him. ‘The battle is at its height; do not announce my death!’. With these words, he died.”

Admiral Yi’s Philosophy

Admiral Yi wrote that a warrior must master three roads, four obligations, five skills, and ten keys to security.

"The three roads are knowledge of the world; understanding of things as they are; and wisdom toward humanity.

The four obligations are to provide national security with minimal cost; to lead others unselfishly; to suffer adversity without fear; and to offer solutions without laying blame.

The five skills are to be flexible without weakness; to be strong without arrogance; to be kind without vulnerability; to be trusting without naïveté; and to have invincible courage. The ten keys to security are purity of purpose, sound strategy, integrity, clarity, lack of covetousness, lack of addiction, a reserved tongue, assertiveness without aggression, being firm and fair, and patience."

 

 

‘By moonlight I sit all alone

                in the lookout on Hansan-do,

My sword is on my thigh,

                I am submerged in deep despair.

From somewhere the shrill note of a pipe –

                will it sever my heartstrings?’

Admiral Yi, his anxiety evident, as he lies in wait on Hansan Island for the enemy invaders in 1592

 

 

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