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Won Hyo Meaning

Won Hyo Tul - 24 Movements
Won Hyo was the noted monk who introduced Buddhism to the Silla dynasty in the year 686 A.D.

Introduced Techniques

Won Hyo
L-stance inward strike
Fixed stance middle side punch
Bending stance forearm guarding block
Walking Stance Circular Block
Side-kick

Step by Step

WON-HYO

Movements - 28

Ready Posture - CLOSED READY STANCE A

  1. Move the left foot to B forming a right L-stance, executing a twin forearm block.
  2. Execute a high inward strike to B with the right knife-hand while bringing the left side fist in front of the right shoulder, maintaining a right L-stance toward B.
  3. Execute a middle punch to B with the left fist while forming a left fixed stance toward B, slipping the left foot to B.
  4. Bring the left foot to the right foot and then move the right foot to A, forming a left L-stance toward A while executing a twin forearm block.
  5. Execute a high inward strike to A with the left knife-hand while bringing the right side fist in front of the left shoulder, maintaining a left L-stance toward A.
  6. Execute a middle punch to A with the right fist while forming a right fixed stance toward A, slipping the right foot to A.
  7. Bring the right foot to the left foot and then turn the face toward D while forming a right bending ready stance A toward D.
  8. Execute a middle side piercing kick to D with the left foot.
  9. Lower the left foot to D forming a right L-stance toward D while executing a middle guarding block to D with a knife-hand.
  10. Move the right foot to D forming a left L-stance toward D while executing guarding block to D with a knife-hand.
  11. Move the left foot to D forming a right L-stance toward D while executing a middle guarding block to D with a knife-hand.
  12. Move the right foot to D forming a right walking stance toward D while executing a middle thrust to D with the right straight finger tip. 
  13. Move the left foot to E turning anti-clockwise to form a right L-stance toward E while executing a twin forearm block.
  14. Execute a high inward strike to E with the right knife-hand while bringing the left side fist in front of the right shoulder, maintaining a right L-stance toward E.
  15. Execute a middle punch to E with the left fist, forming a left fixed stance.
  16. Bring the left foot to the right foot and then move the right foot to F, forming a left L-stance toward F while executing a twin forearm block.
  17. Execute a high inward strike to F with the left knife-hand while bringing the right side fist in front of the left shoulder, maintaining a left L-stance toward F.
  18. Execute a middle punch to F with the right fist, forming a right fixed stance.
  19. Bring the right foot to the left foot and move the left foot to C forming a left walking stance to C while executing a right inner forearm circular block to CF.
  20. Execute a right low front snap kick to C, maintaining the position of the hands.
  21. Lower the right foot to C forming a right walking stance toward C while executing a middle reverse punch to C with the left fist.
  22. Execute a circular block to CE with the left inner forearm while maintaining a right walking stance toward C.
  23. Execute a left low front snap kick to C, keeping the position of the hands.
  24. Lower the left foot to C forming a left walking stance toward C while executing a middle reverse punch to C with the right fist.
  25. Turn the face to C, forming a left bending ready stance A toward C.
  26. Execute a middle side piercing kick to C with the right foot.
  27. Lower the right foot on line CD and then move the left foot to B, turning anti-clockwise to form a right L-stance toward B, at the same time executing a middle guarding block to B with the forearm.
  28. Bring the left foot to the right foot and move the right foot to A forming a left L-stance to A while executing a middle guarding clock to A with the forearm.

END: Bring the right foot back to a ready posture

The story of Won-Hyo
 In the year 650 AD, a Buddhist monk named Won-Hyo and his friend, Eui-Sang, were on their way to China to study with a famous teacher, Huan-Tchuang. It began to pour with rain and it was getting quite dark, so the two travellers took cover in a mountain cave, where they soon fell asleep.

In the middle of the night, Won-Hyo woke up feeling desperately thirsty. Reaching about in the darkness, his groping fingers found a bowl of fresh rainwater. He drank deeply and was refreshed.

‘How strange,’ he thought, drifting back to sleep: ‘the thing that we were running away from, water, is also that which we seek. We run from it, and then we run towards it. Is all life such empty business?’

Won-Hyo awoke at dawn. The rays of the rising sun pierced deeply into the darkness of the cave. He looked around him, and suddenly realised that the bowl from which he had drunk in the night was actually a blood-coated, smashed-in human skull - with strange insects and worms crawling about in the muddy water! He lurched to the cave entrance to be violently sick.

 Then descended upon him a tremendous calm. The same thing that had tasted so good in the night now made him feel revolted: he realised that experience itself was neither good nor bad; only thinking made it so. Laughing, Won-Hyo gave up the idea of going to China. What was the need? He had already found enlightenment, there in the dawn of the mountain cave.

When he got home, he gave up being a monk. He got married, raised a son and wandered about the markets in tatters, singing and dancing. He created the ‘Consciousness Only’ school of Korean Buddhism, based on the idea that only consciousness matters. His name, appropriately, means ‘First Dawn’.

 Summary

  • Monk who helped make Buddhism popular in Korea
  • Lived from 617-686
  • Literal meaning: ‘First Dawn’
  • 28 movements
  • Gained enlightenment after seeing that reality is created by the mind
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