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Intermediate Grading Syllabus

6 kup     5th kup     4th kup     3rd kup

 

STANCE (SOGI)

The forceful and finer techniques of attack and defence are largely dependent on a correct stance.  The stance is the starting point of every Taekwon-do movement.

Stability, agility, balance and flexibility are the controlling factors.

Basic principles for a proper stance are:

  1. Keep the back straight, with few exceptions.
  2. Relax the shoulders.
  3. Tense the abdomen.
  4. Maintain correct facing (full, half or side facing the opponent).
  5. Maintain equilibrium.
  6. Make use of knee spring properly.

FIXED STANCE (Gojung Sogi)

It is an effective stance for attack and defence to the side.  This stance is similar to the L-stance with the following exceptions:

  1. The body weight is distributed evenly on each leg.
  2. The distance between the big toes is about one and a half shoulder widths.

When the right foot is advanced, the stance is called a right fixed stance and vice-versa.  It is always half facing, both in attack and defence.

BENDING STANCE (Guburyo Sogi)

This serves a preparatory stance for side and back kicks, though it is frequently used for defence techniques.  When standing with a right foot it is called a right bending stance and vice-versa.  It is either full or half facing

X STANCE (Kyocha Sogi)

This is a very convenient stance, in particular for attacking the side or front in a jumping motion.  It is frequently used for blocking and serves as a preparatory stance for moving into the next manoeuvre.

  1. Cross one foot over or behind the other, touching the ground slightly with the ball                                                               of the foot.
  2. Place the body weight on the stationery foot.
  3. One foot always crosses over the front of the other with the exception of a                                                                           jumping motion.

When the weight is rested on the right foot, the stance is called a right X-stance and vice-versa.  The other foot is usually placed in front of the stationery foot.  It can be full, side or half facing both in attack and defence.

REAR FOOT STANCE (Dwitbal Sogi)

This is used for defence and occasionally attack.  The advantage of this stance is the ability to kick or adjust the distance from an opponent with the front foot which can move spontaneously without any additional shifting of the body weight to the rear foot.

  1. Move one foot to either the front or the rear at a distance of one shoulder width                                                                                 between the small toes.
  2. Bend the rear leg until the knee comes over the toes, placing the heel slightly                                                                        beyond the heel of the front foot.
  3. Bend the front leg, touching the ground slightly with the ball of the foot.
  4. Keep the toes of the front foot pointing about 25 degrees and the toes of the rear                                                                               foot about 15 degrees inward.
  5. Distribute most of the body weight on the rear foot.

When the right foot is in the rear, the stance is called a right rear foot stance and vice-versa.  It is always half facing, both in attack and defence.  Be sure to keep the knee of the rear leg pointing slightly inward.

LOW STANCE (Nachuo Sogi)

The advantage of this stance is the ease with which one can extend the attacking tool.  It can also develop the leg muscles and is effective to and from the target.  It is similar to the walking stance, though longer by one foot length.  It can be either full or half facing.

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6th kup Green Belt Grading Requirements

MEANING OF GREEN BELT- Signifies the plants growth as the Taekwon-do skill begins to develop.

FUNDAMENTAL EXERCISES
L-stance inward strike
Fixed stance middle side punch
Bending stance forearm guarding block

VITAL SPOTS
Inward knife hand front strike
- Upper neck
- Neck artery
- Angle of mandible
- Sternum

Downward kick
- Bridge of nose
- Shoulder joint
- Philtrum

KICKS
- Downward kick

PATTERN

Won-hyo Tul -24 Movements
- Was the noted monk who introduced Buddhism to the Silla dynasty in the year 686 A.D.

SELF-DEFENCE
Concept:  V-Lock

KNOWLEDGE

CONCENTRATION (Jip joong)

By applying the impact force onto the smallest target area, it will concentrate the force and therefore, increase its effect.  For example, the force of water coming out of a hose is greater if the orifice is smaller.  Conversely, the weight of a man spread out on snowshoes makes hardly any impression on the snow.

The blows in Taekwon-do are often concentrated onto the edge of the open palm or to the crook of the fingers.  It is very important that you should not unleash all your strength at the beginning but gradually, and particularly at the point of contact with the opponents body, the force must be so concentrated as to give a knock-out blow.  That is to say, the shorter the time for the concentration, the greater will be the power of the blow.  The utmost concentration is required in order to mobilise every muscle in the body onto the smallest target area simultaneously.  In conclusion, concentration is done in two ways:

  1. To concentrate every muscle in the body, particularly the bigger muscles around the hip and abdomen towards the appropriate tool to be used at the proper time.
  2. To concentrate such mobilised muscles onto the opponent’s vital spot.

This is the reason why the hip and abdomen are jerked slightly before the hands and feet in any action, whether it is attack or defence (jerking can be executed laterally and vertically).

The story of Won-Hyo
 In the year 650 AD, a Buddhist monk named Won-Hyo and his friend, Eui-Sang, were on their way to China to study with a famous teacher, Huan-Tchuang. It began to pour with rain and it was getting quite dark, so the two travellers took cover in a mountain cave, where they soon fell asleep.

In the middle of the night, Won-Hyo woke up feeling desperately thirsty. Reaching about in the darkness, his groping fingers found a bowl of fresh rainwater. He drank deeply and was refreshed.

‘How strange,’ he thought, drifting back to sleep: ‘the thing that we were running away from, water, is also that which we seek. We run from it, and then we run towards it. Is all life such empty business?’

Won-Hyo awoke at dawn. The rays of the rising sun pierced deeply into the darkness of the cave. He looked around him, and suddenly realised that the bowl from which he had drunk in the night was actually a blood-coated, smashed-in human skull - with strange insects and worms crawling about in the muddy water! He lurched to the cave entrance to be violently sick.

 Then descended upon him a tremendous calm. The same thing that had tasted so good in the night now made him feel revolted: he realised that experience itself was neither good nor bad; only thinking made it so. Laughing, Won-Hyo gave up the idea of going to China. What was the need? He had already found enlightenment, there in the dawn of the mountain cave.

When he got home, he gave up being a monk. He got married, raised a son and wandered about the markets in tatters, singing and dancing. He created the ‘Consciousness Only’ school of Korean Buddhism, based on the idea that only consciousness matters. His name, appropriately, means ‘First Dawn’.

 Summary

  • Monk who helped make Buddhism popular in Korea
  • Lived from 617-686
  • Literal meaning: ‘First Dawn’
  • 28 movements
  • Gained enlightenment after seeing that reality is created by the mind

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5th kup Blue Tip Grading Requirements

FUNDAMENTAL EXERCISE
Sitting stance middle punch
Walking stance front elbow strike
Walking stance palm hooking block
Walking stance double forearm block
L-stance twin knifehand guard
X-stance back fist side strike

KICKS
- Reverse hooking kick

VITAL SPOTS

Front elbow strike
- Philtrum
- Solar plexus
- Floating ribs
- Epigastrium

Reverse hooking kick
- Temple
- Mandibular joint
- Solar plexus

PATTERN

Yul gok Tul - 38 Movements
- is the pseudonym of a great philosopher and scholar Yil (1536-1584) nicknamed the “Confucius of Korea”.  The 38 movements of this pattern refer to his birth place on 38 degree latitude and the diagram represents ‘scholar’.

SELF-DEFENCE
Concept:  S-Lock

KNOWLEDGE
EQUILIBRIUM
Balance is of utmost importance in any type of athletics.  In Taekwon-do, it deserves special consideration.  By keeping the body always in equilibrium, that is, well balanced, a blow is more effective and deadly.  Conversely, the unbalanced one is easily toppled.  The stance should always be stable yet flexible, for both offensive and defensive movements.

Equilibrium is classified into both dynamic and static stability.  They are closely inter-related that the maximum force can only be produced when the static stability is maintained through dynamic stability.

To maintain good equilibrium, the centre of gravity of the stance must fall on a straight-line midway between both legs when the body weight is distributed equally on both legs or in the centre of the foot if it is necessary to concentrate the bulk of body weight on one foot.  The centre of gravity can be adjusted according to body weight.  Flexibility and knee spring are also important in maintaining balance for both a quick attack and instant recovery.  One additional point; the heel of the rear foot should never be off the ground at the moment of impact.  This is not necessary for good balance but also to produce maximum power at the point of impact.

The story of Yul-Gok
Yul-Gok was the nickname of Master Yi I, a great philosopher and teacher of 16th century Korea. He was so clever that he passed the test for choosing public servants at the age of 13. As the Minister for Defence, he was worried about the possibility of Japan invading Korea in 1592 and he recommended that his country create an army of 100,000 men. After leaving government service, he devoted himself to writing. He published many books on philosophy, Confucianism and public administration. His work led him to become known as the Confucius of Korea.

Yi was born in 1536 in his grandparents’ house on Korea’s north-eastern coast and just a little south of the 38th parallel. The 38 movements of this pattern are therefore symbolic of his birthplace. His mother was a talented painter and calligrapher. Her remarkable artistic skill must have rubbed off on the young Yi, who is said to have been able to write characters as soon as he could speak and who wrote an essay at the age of seven.

   Yul-Gok's picture on the Korean 5000 won note

At the age of 15, Yi was so distressed when his mother died that he ran away to a Buddhist monastery where he spent a year deep in meditation, studying Buddhist philosophy and teachings. After leaving the monastery, he devoted his life to government service. He adopted the nickname Yul-Gok, meaning ‘Chestnut Valley’.

Yi had a lot of important jobs, including being the Minister of Defence, the prosecutor-general and ambassador to China. But during this time, the government began to fight within itself and was almost unable to run the country. In 1583, Yi proposed that the government build a 100,000-man army to defeat Japan. But his idea was ignored and the Korean army was hopelessly outgunned against the Japanese. But Yi had already died by then, in January 1584.

Summary

  • Great philosopher and scholar named Yi I (pronounced yee-ee)
  • Lived from 1536-1584
  • Literal meaning: ‘Chestnut Valley’
  • 38 movements refer to his birthplace on the 38th parallel
  • Pattern shape = Chinese word for ‘scholar’
  • Known as the Confucius of Korea

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4th kup Blue Belt Grading Requirements

MEANING OF BLUE BELT- signifies the heaven, towards which the plant matures into a towering tree as training in Taekwon-do progresses.

FUNDAMENTAL EXERCISES
L-stance knife hand middle side block
Walking stance upper elbow strike
Walking stance twin fist high vertical punch
Low stance palm pressing block
Rear foot stance palm upward block
Close stance angle punch
Walking stance twin fist upset punch
Fixed stance U-shaped block
Walking stance x-fist rising block                              

VITAL SPOTS
Upset punch
- Lower abdomen
- Liver
- Kidney
- Epigastrium
- Solar plexus
- Floating ribs
- Umbilicus
- Spleen

Angle punch
- Solar plexus
- Sternum
- Point of chin
- Philtrum

High vertical punch
- Angle of mandible
- Jaw
- Point of chin
- Philtrum

1800 Mid-air kick
- Solar plexus
- Epigastrium
- Lower abdomen
- Sternum
- Philtrum

Upper elbow strike
- Point of chin

KICKS
- 1800 mid-air kick (jumping back kick)

PATTERN
Joon gun Tul -32 Movements
- Is named after the patriot Ahn Joong-Gun, known as the man who played the leading part in the Korea-Japan merger.  There are 32 movements in this pattern to represent Mr Ahn’s age when he died at Lui-shung prison (1910).

SELF-DEFENCE
Concept:  S-Lock

KNOWLEDGE
SPEED (Sokdo)

Speed is the essential factor of force or power.  Scientifically, force equals mass multiplied by acceleration (F=MA) or (P=MV2).

According to the theory of kinetic energy, every object increases its weight as well as speed in a downward movement.  This very principle is applied to this particular art of self-defence.  For this reason, at the moment of impact, the position of the hand normally becomes lower than the shoulder and the foot lower than the hip whilst the body is in the air.

Reaction force, breath control, equilibrium, concentration and relaxation of the muscles cannot be ignored.  However, these are the factors that contribute to the speed and all these factors, together with flexible and rhythmic movements, must be well coordinated to produce the maximum power in Taekwon-do.

The story of Joong-Gun
Ahn Joong-gun was born in 1879 with seven birthmarks across his stomach and chest in the shape of the Big Dipper, a sign his parents took to be a mark of greatness. Indeed, he was an excellent student and he was good at horse riding, archery and shooting. But Ahn is best remembered as a Korean martyr who died for his country, executed for killing the first Japanese Governor-General of Korea.

In his youth, Ahn studied Chinese literature and martial arts. He became a teacher and established his own school, but his career was cut short when Japan invaded and banned people from speaking Korean. Ahn fled to China in 1907 and joined an anti-Japanese movement. In 1909, he and eleven friends each cut off a finger in a sacrificial oath of allegiance to their country's liberation.

Hirobumi Ito was Governor-General, a job that gave him control of Korean affairs. The Japanese took whatever Korean land they wanted and forced King Ko-jong to give up his throne in July 1907. After some severe rioting, Ito disbanded the Korean police force and army and seized control of the prisons and courts.

Ahn, bitterly upset by the Japanese occupation, had resolved to kill Ito on his way to a meeting in China. When Ito arrived at a Manchurian train station on the morning of 26 October, Ahn was waiting for him. As Ito descended from the train, Ahn stepped forward and calmly shot him dead.

Ahn was seized by Japanese soldiers and put in prison at Lu-Shun. In the Japanese prison, he suffered five months of barbaric torture before he was executed in l9l0. But Ahn’s act of martyrdom backfired: Ito's successor, Akashi Genjiro, was even harder on Korea. He shut down the newspapers, arrested thousands of Korean leaders and enforced a strict military rule that lasted another 35 years.

Summary

  • Korean patriot Ahn Joong-gun
  • Lived from 1879-1910
  • Assassinated Hirobumi Ito, the first Japanese Governor-General of Korea
  • 32 movements represent his age when he was executed at Lu-Shun prison

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3rd kup Red Belt Grading Requirements

FUNDAMENTAL EXERCISE
Walking stance upset fingertip low thrust
L-stance double forearm low pushing block
Walking stance X-fist pressing block
Close stance back-fist side-back strike
Walking stance flat fingertip high thrust
Close stance twin elbow side thrust
Walking stance inner forearm circular block
Sitting stance outer forearm W-shape block
L-stance back-fist side-back strike
X-stance X-fist pressing block
L-stance knife-hand low guarding block
Front knee upward kick

VITAL SPOTS
Backfist side-back strike
- Philtrum
- Bridge of nose
- Jaw

Flat fingertip thrust
- Eye
- Ribs
- Abdomen

Elbow side thrust
- Solar plexus
- Epigastrium
- Floating rib

Upward knee kick
- Lower abdomen
- Solar plexus
- Epigastrium

Upset fingertip thrust
- Lower abdomen
- Floating ribs
- Pubic region

Reverse turning kick
- Solar plexus
- Ribs

KICK                                                              
- Skipping Front Snap Kick
- Skipping Side piercing-kick
- Skipping Turning Kick
- Downward Kick & Reverse turning kick

EXERCISES
- level 2 Push ups (Crab)
- level 2 Crunches (feet in air)
- level 2 Squats (Cossack stretch/squat)

PATTERN
Toi gye Tul - 37 Movements
- Is the pen name of the noted scholar Yi Hwang (16th century), an authority on neo-confucianism.  The 37 movements of the pattern refer to his birth place on 37 degree latitude, the diagram represents ‘scholar’.

SELF-DEFENCE
Concept:  Kick Defence

KNOWLEDGE
MASS (Zilyang)
Mathematically, the maximum kinetic energy or force is obtained from maximum body weight and speed and it is all important that the body weight be increased during the execution of the blow.  No doubt the maximum body weight is applied with the motion by turning the hip.  The large abdominal muscles are twisted to provide additional body momentum.  Thus the hip rotates in the same direction as that of the attacking or blocking tool.  Another way of increasing body weight is the utilisation of a springing action of the knee joint.  This is achieved by slightly raising the hip at the beginning of the motion and lowering the hip at the moment of impact to drop the body weight into the motion. In summary, it is necessary to point out that the principles of force outlined here hold just as true today in our modern scientific and nuclear age as they did centuries ago.

I am sure that when you go through this art, both in theory and in practice. You will find that the scientific basis of the motions and the real power which comes out of a small human body, cannot fail to impress you.

The story of Toi-Gye
Toi-Gye was but one of the many nicknames of Yi Hwang, the most important Confucian philosopher of the Yi Dynasty and a slightly older contemporary of Yul-Gok. Toi-Gye was born in Andong-gun in 1501. A highly intelligent man, Yi passed the public service exams at the age of 34, taking on a variety of important ministerial and academic posts including Minister of the Board of Ceremonies. However, he soon resigned from government service, returning to his beloved hometown where he became a scholar. Toi-Gye means ‘receding stream’ and refers to a small stream in Andong-gun.

Yi set up a school in Andong-gun, devoting his efforts to the education of future generations. He invited prominent scholars to teach Confucian classics and in only a short time, it became one of the country’s leading centres for academic thought. Yi was able to draw on his government connections to obtain money to make his school even bigger and better. As a result, the academy and the educational system it employed became the predominant style of school in the Chosun Dynasty. The school is still a centre for the study of philosophy. A wooden house just behind the academy has been the home of Yi's descendants for the past 16 generations.

Yi developed a practical teaching method that stressed the need to perfect oneself through the building of good moral character, learning and reflection. He had three main rules: loyalty to king; devotion to parents; and keeping the virtues of faithfulness, chastity and fidelity. His ideas were influential not only in Korea but also in Japan following the Meiji Restoration.

Summary

  • Great philosopher and scholar named Yi Hwang
  • Lived from 1501-1570
  • Literal meaning: ‘Receding Stream’
  • 37 movements refer to his birthplace on the 37th parallel, at Andong-gun
  • The Chosun Dynasty’s foremost authority on Neo-Confucianism

Pattern shape represents the Chinese character for the word ‘scholar’

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6th Kup Pattern

WON-HYO

Movements - 28

Ready Posture - CLOSED READY STANCE A

  1. Move the left foot to B forming a right L-stance, executing a twin forearm block.
  2. Execute a high inward strike to B with the right knife-hand while bringing the left side fist in front of the right shoulder, maintaining a right L-stance toward B.
  3. Execute a middle punch to B with the left fist while forming a left fixed stance toward B, slipping the left foot to B.
  4. Bring the left foot to the right foot and then move the right foot to A, forming a left L-stance toward A while executing a twin forearm block.
  5. Execute a high inward strike to A with the left knife-hand while bringing the right side fist in front of the left shoulder, maintaining a left L-stance toward A.
  6. Execute a middle punch to A with the right fist while forming a right fixed stance toward A, slipping the right foot to A.
  7. Bring the right foot to the left foot and then turn the face toward D while forming a right bending ready stance A toward D.
  8. Execute a middle side piercing kick to D with the left foot.
  9. Lower the left foot to D forming a right L-stance toward D while executing a middle guarding block to D with a knife-hand.
  10. Move the right foot to D forming a left L-stance toward D while executing guarding block to D with a knife-hand.
  11. Move the left foot to D forming a right L-stance toward D while executing a middle guarding block to D with a knife-hand.
  12. Move the right foot to D forming a right walking stance toward D while executing a middle thrust to D with the right straight finger tip. 
  13. Move the left foot to E turning anti-clockwise to form a right L-stance toward E while executing a twin forearm block.
  14. Execute a high inward strike to E with the right knife-hand while bringing the left side fist in front of the right shoulder, maintaining a right L-stance toward E.
  15. Execute a middle punch to E with the left fist, forming a left fixed stance.
  16. Bring the left foot to the right foot and then move the right foot to F, forming a left L-stance toward F while executing a twin forearm block.
  17. Execute a high inward strike to F with the left knife-hand while bringing the right side fist in front of the left shoulder, maintaining a left L-stance toward F.
  18. Execute a middle punch to F with the right fist, forming a right fixed stance.
  19. Bring the right foot to the left foot and move the left foot to C forming a left walking stance to C while executing a right inner forearm circular block to CF.
  20. Execute a right low front snap kick to C, maintaining the position of the hands.
  21. Lower the right foot to C forming a right walking stance toward C while executing a middle reverse punch to C with the left fist.
  22. Execute a circular block to CE with the left inner forearm while maintaining a right walking stance toward C.
  23. Execute a left low front snap kick to C, keeping the position of the hands.
  24. Lower the left foot to C forming a left walking stance toward C while executing a middle reverse punch to C with the right fist.
  25. Turn the face to C, forming a left bending ready stance A toward C.
  26. Execute a middle side piercing kick to C with the right foot.
  27. Lower the right foot on line CD and then move the left foot to B, turning anti-clockwise to form a right L-stance toward B, at the same time executing a middle guarding block to B with the forearm.
  28. Bring the left foot to the right foot and move the right foot to A forming a left L-stance to A while executing a middle guarding clock to A with the forearm.

END: Bring the right foot back to a ready posture

5th Kup Pattern

YUL-GOK

Movements - 38

Ready Posture - PARALLEL READY STANCE

  1. Move the left foot to B forming a sitting stance toward D while extending the left fist to D horizontally.
  2. Execute a right middle punch to D, maintaining a sitting stance toward D.
  3. Execute a left middle punch to D, maintaining a sitting stance toward D.

Perform 2 and 3 in a fast motion.

  1. Bring the left foot to the right foot and then move the right foot to A forming a sitting stance to D, extending the right fist to D horizontally.
  2. Execute a left middle punch to D, maintaining a sitting stance toward D.
  3. Execute a right middle punch to D, maintaining a sitting stance toward D.

Perform 5 and 6 in a fast motion.

  1. Move the right foot to Ad forming a right walking stance toward AD while executing a middle side block to AD with the right inner forearm.
  2. Execute a low front snap kick to AD with the left foot keeping the position of the hands as they were in 7.
  3. Lower the left foot to AD forming a left walking stance toward AD while executing a middle punch to AD with the left fist.
  4. Execute a middle punch to AD with the right fist while maintaining a left walking stance toward AD.

Perform 9 and 10 in a fast motion.

  1. Move the left foot to BD forming a left walking stance toward BD, at the same time executing a middle side block to BD with the left inner forearm.
  2. Execute a low front snap kick to BD with the right foot keeping the position of the hands as they were in 11.
  3. Lower the right foot to BD forming a right walking stance toward BD while executing a middle punch to BD with the right fist.
  4. Execute a middle punch to BD with the left fist while maintaining a right walking stance toward BD. Perform 13 and 14 in a fast motion.
  5. Execute a middle hooking block to D with the right palm while forming a right walking stance toward D, pivoting with the left foot.
  6. Execute a middle hooking block to D with the left palm while maintaining a right walking stance toward D.
  7. Execute a middle punch to D with the right fist while maintaining a right walking stance toward D.

Execute 16 and 17 in a connecting motion.

  1. Move the left foot to D forming a left walking stance toward D while executing a middle hooking block to D with the left palm.
  2. Execute a middle hooking block to D with the right palm while maintaining a left walking stance toward D.
  3. Execute a middle punch to D with the left fist while maintaining a left walking stance toward D.

Execute 19 and 20 in a connecting motion.

  1. Move the right foot to D forming a right walking stance toward D, at the same time executing a middle punch to D with the right fist.
  2. Turn the face to D forming a right bending ready stance A toward D.
  3. Execute a middle side piercing kick to D with the left foot.
  4. Lower the left foot to D forming a left walking stance toward D while striking the left palm with the right front elbow.
  5. Turn the face to C, forming a left bending ready stance A toward C.
  6. Execute a middle side piercing kick to C with the right foot.
  7. Lower the right foot to C forming a right walking stance toward C while striking the right palm with the left front elbow.
  8. Move the left foot to E forming a right L-stance toward E while executing a twin knife-hand block.
  9. Move the right foot to E forming a right walking stance toward E while executing a middle thrust to E with the right straight finger tip.
  10. Move the right foot to F turning clockwise to form a left L-stance toward F while executing a twin knife-hand block.
  11. Move the left foot to F forming a left walking stance toward F while executing a middle thrust to F with the left straight finger tip.
  12. Move the left foot to C forming a left walking stance toward C while executing a high side block to C with the left outer forearm.
  13. Execute a middle punch to C with the right fist while maintaining a left walking stance toward C.
  14. Move the right foot to C forming a right walking stance toward C while executing a high side block to C with the right outer forearm.
  15. Execute a left middle punch to C, maintaining a right walking stance toward C.
  16. Jump to C forming a left X-stance toward B while executing a high side strike to C with the left back fist.
  17. Move the right foot to A forming a right walking stance toward A at the same time executing a high block to A with the right double forearm
  18. Bring the right foot to the left foot and move the left foot to B forming a left walking stance to B while executing a high block to B with the left double forearm.

END: Bring the left foot back to a ready posture.

4th Kup Pattern

JOONG-GUN

Movements - 32

Ready Posture - CLOSED READY STANCE B

  1. Move the left foot to B forming a right L-stance toward B while executing a middle block to B with the left reverse knife-hand.
  2. Execute a low side front snap kick to B with the left foot, keeping the position of the hands as they were in 1.
  3. Lower the left foot to B and then move the right foot to B forming a left rear foot stance toward B while executing a right upward palm block.
  4. Move the right foot to A forming a left L-stance toward A, at the same time executing a middle block to A with a right reverse knife-hand.
  5. Execute a low side front snap kick to A with the right foot, keeping the position of the hands as they were in 4.
  6. Lower the right foot to A and then move the left foot to A forming a right rear foot stance toward A while executing a left upward palm block.
  7. Move the left foot to D forming a right L-stance toward D while executing a middle guarding block to D with a knife-hand.
  8. Execute a right upper elbow strike while forming a left walking stance toward D, slipping the left foot to D.
  9. Move the right foot to D forming a left L-stance toward D while executing a middle guarding block to D with a knife-hand.
  10. Execute a left upper elbow strike while forming a right walking stance

toward D, slipping the right foot to D.

  1. Move the left foot to D forming a left walking stance toward D while executing a high vertical punch to D with a twin fist.
  1. Move the right foot to D forming a right walking stance toward D while executing an upset punch to D with a twin fist.
  2. Move the right foot on line CD and then turn anti-clockwise to form a left walking stance to C, executing a rising block with an X-fist.
  3. Move the left foot to E forming a right L-stance toward E while executing a high side strike to E with the left back fist.
  4. Twist the left fist anti-clockwise until the back fist faces downward, forming a left walking stance toward E, slipping the left foot to E.
  5. Execute a high punch to E with the right fist while maintaining a left walking stance toward E.

Perform 15 and 16 in a fast motion.

  1. Bring the left foot to the right foot and move the right foot to F, forming a left L-stance toward F, then execute a high side strike to F with a right back fist.
  2. Twist the right fist clockwise until the back fist faces downward, forming a right walking stance toward F, slipping the right foot to F.
  3. Execute a high punch to F with the left fist while maintaining a right walking stance toward F.

Perform 18 and 19 in a fast motion.

  1. Bring the right foot to the left foot and move the left foot to C forming a left walking stance to C while executing a high block to C with a left double forearm.
  1. Execute a left middle punch to C, forming a right L-stance toward C,
  2. Execute a middle side piercing kick to C with the right foot.
  3. Lower the right foot to C forming a right walking stance toward C while executing a high block to C with the right double forearm.
  4. Execute a right middle punch to C, forming a left L-stance toward C.
  5. Execute a middle side piercing kick to C with the left foot.
  6. Lower the left foot to C forming a right L-stance toward C while executing a middle guarding block to C with the forearm.
  7. Execute a pressing block with the right palm while forming a left low stance toward C, slipping the left foot to C.

Perform in a slow motion.

  1. Move the right foot to C forming a left L-stance toward C while executing a middle guarding block to C with the forearm.
  2. Execute a pressing block with the left palm while forming a right low stance toward C, slipping the right foot to C.

Perform in a slow motion.

  1. Bring the left foot to the right foot forming a closed stance toward A while executing an angle punch with the right fist.

Perform in a slow motion.

  1. Move the right foot to A forming a right fixed stance toward A while executing a U-shape block to A.
  2. Bring the right foot to the left foot, move the left foot to B to form a left fixed stance to B, at the same time executing a U-shape block to B.

END: Bring the left foot back to a ready posture.

3rd Kup Pattern

TOI-GYE

Movements - 37

Ready Posture - CLOSED READY STANCE B

  1. Move the left foot to B forming a right L-stance toward B while executing a middle block to B with the left inner forearm.
  2. Execute a low thrust to B with the right upset finger tip while forming a left walking stance toward B, slipping the left foot to B.
  3. Bring the left foot to the right foot to form a closed stance toward D while executing a side back strike to C with the right back fist, extending the left arm to the side in a downward motion.

Perform in a slow motion.

  1. Move the right foot to A forming a left L-stance toward A while executing a middle block to A with the right inner forearm.
  2. Execute a low thrust to A with the left upset finger tip while forming a right walking stance toward A, slipping the right foot to A.
  1. Bring the right foot to the left foot to form a closed stance toward D while executing a side back strike to C with the left back fist, extending the right arm to the side in a downward motion.

Perform in a slow motion.

  1. Move the left foot to D forming a left walking stance toward D while executing a pressing block with an X-fist.
  2. Execute a high vertical punch to D with a twin fist while maintaining a left walking stance toward D.

Perform 7 and 8 in a continuous motion.

  1. Execute a middle front snap kick to D with the right foot, keeping the position of the hands as they were in 8.
  2. Lower the right foot to D forming a right walking stance toward D while executing a middle punch to D with the right fist.
  1. Execute a left middle punch to D, maintaining a right walking stance to D.
  2. Bring the left foot to the right foot forming a closed stance toward F while executing a twin side elbow thrust.

Perform in slow motion.

  1. Move the right foot to F in a stamping motion forming a sitting stance to C, executing a W-shape block to C with the right outer forearm.
  2. Turn the left foot clockwise to F in a stamping motion to form a sitting stance to D, executing a W-shape block to D with the left outer forearm.
  3. Turn the left foot clockwise to E in a stamping motion to form a sitting stance to C, executing a W-shape block to C with the left outer forearm.
  4. Turn the right foot anti-clockwise to E in a stamping motion to form a sitting stance to D, executing a W-shape block to D with the right outer forearm.
  5. Turn the left foot clockwise to E in a stamping motion to form a sitting stance to C, executing a W-shape block to C with the left outer forearm.
  6. Turn the left foot clockwise to F in a stamping motion to form a sitting stance to D, executing a W-shape block to D with the left outer forearm.
  7. Bring the right foot to the left foot and move the left foot to D forming a right L-stance to D, executing a low pushing block with the left double forearm.
  8. Extend both hands upward as if to grab the opponent's head while forming a left walking stance toward D, slipping the left foot to D.
  9. Execute a right knee upward kick, pulling both hands downward.
  10. Lower the right foot to the left foot and move the left foot to C forming a right L-stance toward C, executing a middle guarding block to C with a knife-hand.
  1. Execute a low side front snap kick to C with the left foot, keeping the position of the hands as they were in 22.
  1. Lower the left foot to C forming a left walking stance toward C while executing a high thrust to C with the left flat finger tip.
  1. Move the right foot to C forming a left L-stance toward C while executing a middle guarding block to C with a knife-hand.
  2. Execute a low side front snap kick to C with the right foot, keeping the position of the hands as they were in 25.
  3. Lower the right foot to C forming a right walking stance toward C while executing a high thrust to C with the right flat finger tip.
  4. Move the right foot to D forming a right L-stance to C, executing a right back fist side back strike to D and a low block to C with the left forearm.
  5. Jump to C forming a right X-stance toward A while executing a pressing block with an X-fist.
  6. Move the right foot to C forming a right walking stance toward C while executing a high block to C with the right double forearm.
  1. Move the left foot to B forming a right L-stance toward B while executing a low guarding block to B with a knife-hand.
  2. Execute a circular block to BD with the right inner forearm while forming a left walking stance toward B, slipping the left foot to B.
  3. Bring the left foot to the right foot and move the right foot to A forming a left L-stance to A, while executing a low guarding block to A with a knife-hand.
  4. Execute a circular block to AD with the left inner forearm while forming a right walking stance toward A, slipping the right foot to A.
  5. Execute a circular block to CE with the right inner forearm while forming a left walking stance toward CE.
  6. Execute a circular block to AD with the left inner forearm while forming a right walking stance toward A.
  7. Move the right foot on line AB to form a sitting stance toward D while executing a middle punch to D with the right fist.

END: Bring the right foot back to a ready posture.

Toi Gye Tul

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